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10/19/2005

Comments

jeff

From a lot of web searching and some personal experience, I think I've come up with a method to functionally destroy the data on a burned CD-R. First, completely remove the foil reflective layer via abrasion (sandpaper, butter knife, whatever). Second, apply nail-polish remover (containing acetone) to the newly foil-free side of the disk. The organic data-carrying dye will come off with ease.

adam

the data is contained on the plastic of a cd. I am currently holding a stack of 25 clear cd-r's. Yes they are see-thru and you can write data on them and play them etc whilst they are transparent. there is no other suface ontop. just plastic with some funky trasnsparent composition inside that can be altered into the creation of binary data.

ending

If you soak the CDs in water for a day or two the foil part should just rub off easily. It takes a day or two but its easy because you can get a bucket and dump in hundreads of cds and just let them soak. Either that or I tested it on a cheap ass cd, lol.

Yes

gasoline+match :D

micro

use a microwave!

anonymous coward

i used to actually use a bad burned cd as a coaster. it got wet from condensation from cans of cold pop. it did eventally remove all dye from the cd. i wonder how long it would take cds to clear up if completely immersed in water or some other solvent?

dh

two words, skeet shoot

d-block

1.YOU SOULD USE AN ADAPTER FORM RADIO SHAQ, WALMART,ECT, OR ONE OF YOUR OLD ONES 6- 12 VOLT .

2. GO TO WAL MART IN AUTO SECTION, PEP BOYS, DISCOUNT AUTO PARTS, GO ON LINE. THERE ARE A LOT OF PLACES YOU CAN FIND THEM. LOOK FOR THE CAR NEON LIGHTS IN SIZES RANGING FROM 4" INCHES TO 6' FEET .

3. SEE THE THING IS IF IT IS FOR A CAR IT RUNS ON 12 VOLTS BUT MOST OF THEM DEPENDING ON TH E SIZE WILL DO FINE ON 9 OR EVEN 6 VOLTS SO YOR CAN USE IT IN YOUR HOME IF YOU USE A 12 VOLT ADAPTER. I VAVE DONE THIS EVEN WITH A 9 AND EVEN 6 VOLT ADAPTER.

4. IT IS ALWAYS BEST TO TRY IT WITH A 9 O EVEN 6 VOLT FIRST TO SEE THE HOW BRIGHT IT IS , REMEMBER THE LESS BRIGHT THE LONGER BULB WILL LAST.

Jim

I have done the CD Lamp. I used 61 CDs and spacers between the CDs.
http://photocreations.ca/cd_lamp2/index.html

Anonymous Coward

the dye layer is between a couple layers of plastic if i remember correctly. And yes it is the layer responsible for data storage. Simply removing the foil on the disc will not destroy the data, even if i'm wrong about the sandwiching of the dye layer. (though it does look kinda cool)
As for destroying 200+ cd's quickly... Floor sander + good adhesive + floor you can attach cd's to label side up. If you want to make sure the data is gone the CD must be clear.
Any chemical that would melt the plastic would work but it wouldn't be that quick (turpentine *barely* *starts* to remove the ink on AOL CD's - i think we tried gasoline too...)

Gamete

i've not tried, but a sandblaster would probably romove the reflective layer quite quickly.

ben

If you want to a whole bunch at once, put them in the microwave for a couple seconds.

Also, to launch these, try something rubbery that would loosely hold on the the cd and flick your wrist. One thing that works really well is one of those little rubber bendable hands, you can stick a cd between the fingers and flick it and the cd with fly superbly.

Unomi

I never thought of that, but I think it is very time and effort consuming. Ehm..... if you want to do some CD's like 200+ (like me).

To be specific: I want to make a lamp out of a stack of CD's. I do have a bunch already, but it would be neat if I could clear the data/foil of each, so no colored labels are left on the lamp. No.. flipping it to the reflective side doesn't make sense since both sided are become visible in the lamp.

Has anyone has a clue how to remove it quicker? Are there any dissolvent liquids (nailpolish remover maybe?) that can do this?

I.o.w. what is a cheap and quick way to 'clean' 200+ CD's?

- Unomi -

eric

no need for flaming here, be nice kids!

jon was right, reed wasn't

as for the confusion, the poster is listed beneath the comments below the dotted line.

i know it is confusing.

duffman3030

@ jon

friend you are a complete idiot. those impresions are in the metal not the plastic.
yeah ive probably been trolled, but i dont want people who dont know how cds work being misled by retarded comments.

eric

this explains a lot-

http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/cd-burner4.htm


A CD-R doesn't have the same bumps and lands as a conventional CD. Instead, the disc has a dye layer underneath a smooth, reflective surface. On a blank CD-R disc, the dye layer is completely translucent, so all light reflects. The write laser darkens the spots where the bumps would be in a conventional CD, forming non-reflecting areas.


Wanon

Sorry, I didn't realise the author was named under the comment. Sorry Jon. That was for Reed.

This should work, as would nuking it in the microwave for a few seconds.

*Evil Grin*

Wanon

Jon:

The data is actually stored in the dye, which is actually on the sticker side of the disc. Well between those layers and the polymer layers. The label side is actually more sensitive to data damage than the plastic side.

Also, the 1's and 0's are not whether there is a pit or a land. It's whether there is a change or not.

Scratches don't kill the data, they just interfere with the drive laser to prevent it from reading the data. That's why some of those scratch removing products work. They destroy part of the disc to get rid of the scratch.

The sheer amound of error correction on the discs make them pretty resilient anyway.

Jon

The first comment is incorrect. Removing the silver will destroy the data. The clear plasic does not do didly squat. The silver layer contains orgainic dyes that can changed to 1's by the laser when a disc is "burned."

Reed

Friend, I believe the data is stored on the clear part of the disk. When you "burn" a cd, it refers to a laser literally burning tiny recesses into the underside of the disk. Thus, an indent represents a one while no indent represents a zero. Or vise-versa. Whatever. This is why scratching a disk isn't the brightest idea.

At any rate, the data is stored in the plastic disk; the reflective layer on the top of the disk is merely there to make the reading laser's job easier. And to keep you from getting fingerprints everywhere and messing up the way it sees.

Here is a microscopic image of a DVD's surface. DVDs and CDs are essentially the same thing. http://www.dvdplusvideo.com/images2/DVD_CD.jpg

n3ldan

oh yeah, if you use ht emasking tape, don't forget to start it with a slice in the foil or a little cut in the disk, it's not strong enough to pull the foil off wihtout one.

evilgeezer

I just throw them in the microwave and nuke em for about 8 seconds.

n3ldan

I had SO many good times doing this during study. I woudl bring a stack of coasters, take off hte foil, my friends and I woudl cut them up, wait for the teacher to leave, and then hav ninja duels. It was intense. I used masking tape though, it came out clear-er.

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